Drug Use and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)

By The Valor Team
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 at 4:33 pm in

NAS is a group of conditions caused when a baby withdraws from certain drugs that he/she was exposed to in the womb. NAS is most often a result of a woman taking opioids during pregnancy, but can also be caused by antidepressants, barbiturates or benzodiazepines (sleeping pills). When you take these drugs during pregnancy, they can pass through the placenta and cause serious problems for your baby. 

Addiction: Your Adult Child Needs To Hear From You

Friday, January 17, 2020 at 1:21 pm in

As a parent, you always have your child’s best interests at heart. Finding out that your child is struggling with addiction is heartbreaking regardless of their age. 
You may feel it's not your place to say anything. After all, your child is grown up and can make his or her own decisions. 

The truth is that your adult child needs to hear from you. They need to know you're aware of what's going on, that they are not alone, and that you want to help.

Advice for Parents of Addicted Children

Friday, November 8, 2019 at 10:42 am in

If you are a parent whose child is suffering from addiction, your whole world has been turned upside down. You probably thought it could never happen to you.

Make no mistake: Addiction can happen to anyone. Finding out your child suffers from the disease known as addiction can be devastating. 

Enabling vs. Helping Behaviors

By The Valor Team
Tuesday, July 2, 2019 at 4:48 pm in


“Make a habit of two things–to help, or at least to do no harm.”
- Hippocrates

It's human nature to care for and want to help someone you love. However, there is a very fine line between helping someone and enabling bad behaviors.

So, how does helping differ from enabling?

The Benefits of Family Participation in Addiction Treatment

By The Valor Team
Monday, July 1, 2019 at 4:38 pm in


The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence calls addiction a family disease. That’s because addiction affects the entire family and puts all family members under a great deal of stress. Each family member is uniquely affected with a wide range of negative outcomes. 

Family members often cope with addiction in unhealthy ways. Codependent and enabling behaviors are common among families living with addiction. These types of behaviors can foster the addiction as well as make recovery very difficult for both the addicted loved one and the family members.